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  1. #21
    cnocpm cnocpm is offline

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    [QUOTE=Drogheda445;7934363]"Runners" for sneakers or trainers
    "[QUOTE]


    Gutties.
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  2. #22
    'orebel 'orebel is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnocpm View Post


    Gutties.
    Rubber dollies

    Edit; I see He3 had that already. He must be from Cork or was this used elsewhere?
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  3. #23
    Half Nelson Half Nelson is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    "Runners" for sneakers or trainers
    "Pairer" for pencil sharpeners
    And 'rubbers' for, eh, rubbin'.
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  4. #24
    Bleu Poppy Bleu Poppy is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    Following on from a similar thread concerning archaic expressions that have fallen out of use (the creator of which has now sadly moved on from P.ie):

    Archaic phrases

    ...perhaps it would be interesting to have a similar discussion, this time on expressions which are unique to Ireland, or certain parts of it. Hiberno-English, or Irish English, includes a number of peculiarities which many other English-speakers find incomprehensible or old-fashioned, many of them rooted in the Irish language or in Old English.

    - Using "ye" as a pluralisation of you.
    - Using the word "footpath" to mean "pavement" in British English or "sidewalk" in American English
    - "Acting the maggot", or being immature.
    - Spelling whiskey with an e, which is spelt without one in other dialects of English
    - Pronouncing "r" as "orr", which is pronounced "arr" in other countries
    - "Lashing rain"
    - "Hot press"
    - "Get up the yard!"

    Listed above are some examples. Feel free to add your own.

    PS If the mods intend to move this to the "chat" forum, feel free to do so, although a number of similar threads (including the one linked above) were kept on the main board.
    Beggin your honour's pardon, but whiskey is spelt that way in the States:







    Even the Canadian firm of Seagram's acknowledged this when they went south of the 49th parallel to expand their business-

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  5. #25
    Bleu Poppy Bleu Poppy is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    "Runners" for sneakers or trainers
    They're 'tackies' in Limerick
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  6. #26
    ibis ibis is offline

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    "Soft day"
    "High stool day"
    "Lamping"
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  7. #27
    alloverbartheshouting alloverbartheshouting is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by 'orebel View Post
    Some Cork ones. See if you know the meanings.

    Two-bulb
    Steerinah
    On the lang
    Mockeeah
    Break your melt
    Me daza
    Getting a langie
    Ballahs
    Glassie alleys
    Bathinahs
    Give someone a berril
    A breezer
    Cawhake
    Lapsy pa
    Cheeser
    Donkey’s gudge
    Guzz-eyed
    Dowtcha boy
    Gooza
    Dawk
    Sorry, but language do yis speak in Cork?
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  8. #28
    'orebel 'orebel is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by alloverbartheshouting View Post
    Sorry, but language do yis speak in Cork?
    Cork is great!

    How many did you get?
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  9. #29
    NYCKY NYCKY is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by 'orebel View Post
    Really? I thought that was international.

    I has always thought so too. I was asked about a partial paydown from a client, and I responded, oh they put that one on the long finger. We had a laugh when I (had to) explained it but when I googled it after, it came as one that wasn't even used in the UK.
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  10. #30
    NYCKY NYCKY is offline
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    Some more

    "ah there is no drying out there today"

    "I am off to town now for a few messages"
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