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  1. #11
    Cellach Cellach is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    "Runners" for sneakers or trainers
    Tackies.
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  2. #12
    He3 He3 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    "Runners" for sneakers or trainers
    You mean rubber dollies.
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  3. #13
    tigerben tigerben is offline
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    Skitten/skittin for laughing.
    Messages for food shopping .
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  4. #14
    Q-Tours Q-Tours is offline
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    'Yer man' and 'Yer wan'.

    I have adequate fluency in five languages and none - none I tell yiz - has a phrase that encompasses the same sniff of indifference.
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  5. #15
    NYCKY NYCKY is offline
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    "Putting something on the long finger".

    I used it at a meeting at work and everybody looked at me like I had two heads, so I googled it after the meeting and yep, it's uniquely Irish.
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  6. #16
    Uh oooh Uh oooh is offline

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    Our strange use of the English word "No". The word no is one of the smallest words in the english language, it is also one of its most powerful emphatic and abrupt words. Despite what many may think the Irish language still has a hold on what may be called the Irish psyche. There is no direct translation of the english emphatic No into irish, the word does not exist in the Irish language, and Irish people still struggle to understand how to use the word, Irish people still use and interpret the english word "No" as a polite maybe/possibly.

    During the financial crisis there was a press conference with Enda and Angela where Angela was stating quite clearly "Nein" there is no special case for Ireland, while Enda is there explaining Angela is using the irish version of that word, nod nod wink wink
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  7. #17
    'orebel 'orebel is offline
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    Some Cork ones. See if you know the meanings.

    Two-bulb
    Steerinah
    On the lang
    Mockeeah
    Break your melt
    Me daza
    Getting a langie
    Ballahs
    Glassie alleys
    Bathinahs
    Give someone a berril
    A breezer
    Cawhake
    Lapsy pa
    Cheeser
    Donkey’s gudge
    Guzz-eyed
    Dowtcha boy
    Gooza
    Dawk
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  8. #18
    Drogheda445 Drogheda445 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uh oooh View Post
    Our strange use of the English word "No". The word no is one of the smallest words in the english language, it is also one of its most powerful emphatic and abrupt words. Despite what many may think the Irish language still has a hold on what may be called the Irish psyche. There is no direct translation of the english emphatic No into irish, the word does not exist in the Irish language, and Irish people still struggle to understand how to use the word, Irish people still use and interpret the english word "No" as a polite maybe/possibly.

    During the financial crisis there was a press conference with Enda and Angela where Angela was stating quite clearly "Nein" there is no special case for Ireland, while Enda is there explaining Angela is using the irish version of that word, nod nod wink wink
    You're right. Its one of the reasons why Irish people will often respond to yes/no questions with "It is/It isn't", "I am/I'm not" etc, even in English.
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  9. #19
    'orebel 'orebel is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYCKY View Post
    "Putting something on the long finger".

    I used it at a meeting at work and everybody looked at me like I had two heads, so I googled it after the meeting and yep, it's uniquely Irish.
    Really? I thought that was international.
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  10. #20
    Kev408 Kev408 is offline

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    I'll be dug outta ye.
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