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  1. #21
    Sister Mercedes Sister Mercedes is offline
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    Two of the most urbane cosmopolitan Irish accents I've heard where from two men from Upperchurch in the mountainous backwoods of North Tipperary. Former FG Minister and EU Commissioner Dick Burke, and Princess Margaret's BFF Ned Ryan.
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  2. #22
    discentes discentes is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seanie Lemass View Post
    Good point Cookie regarding difference between parents and offspring. A typical Dublin middle class accent to me would be Gay Byrne or even Brian O'Driscoll in someone younger (which makes the 'amaze balls ad quite funny

    Most working class Dubs of older generation would have harsher accent than Byrnes but not that different really. Brendan Behan would be good example, and he was hamming it up!

    Outsiders often too mistake the scanger junkie scumbag Dublin accent for Dublin working class which it is not. No-one I know speaks like that!
    Indicative of a society that's more separate? Or is that to extrapolate too much?

    EDIT: Having just listened to Behan, there's a world of difference between Byrne and Beehan. Beehan even does that thing with the 'r' in "General".
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  3. #23
    Seanie Lemass Seanie Lemass is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sister Mercedes View Post
    Two of the most urbane cosmopolitan Irish accents I've heard where from two men from Upperchurch in the mountainous backwoods of North Tipperary. Former FG Minister and EU Commissioner Dick Burke, and Princess Margaret's BFF Ned Ryan.

    My grandad was from outside Upperchurch. He sounded nothing like Burke! Churchill's buddy Brendan Bracken was from nearby Templemore.

    There is scene in Kilnaskully where Pat Shortt is talking to two Poles who are speaking Polish. He Says: "Those Uppoerchurch boys are fierce hard to understand."
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  4. #24
    discentes discentes is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sister Mercedes View Post
    Two of the most urbane cosmopolitan Irish accents I've heard where from two men from Upperchurch in the mountainous backwoods of North Tipperary. Former FG Minister and EU Commissioner Dick Burke, and Princess Margaret's BFF Ned Ryan.
    I'm a little restrained by my lack of understanding of accents anywhere other than the UK and US, but it is interesting how in the UK and Ireland an accent often conveys nationality, but nothing more specific about the speaker's place of upbringing, whereas this rarer in the United States. The narrative still exists, mind you:



    But I think it's far less prevalent.
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  5. #25
    zippo222 zippo222 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    I'm a little restrained by my lack of understanding of accents anywhere other than the UK and US, but it is interesting how in the UK and Ireland an accent often conveys nationality, but nothing more specific about the speaker's place of upbringing, whereas this rarer in the United States. The narrative still exists, mind you:



    But I think it's far less prevalent.

    Er, no.
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  6. #26
    CookieMonster CookieMonster is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenbacks View Post
    One thing that drives me mad is country folk trying to emulate that accent. I have one guy from longford in college who ends every sentence with 'like'. "I love that place for coffee like", " The bus was late again like". It is a horrendous accent and that girl on the video was plain embarrassing and rude. Those lads weren't much better either.
    People from Limerick who has never been to Dublin, will never be allowed into Dublin and probably don't have a television add "like" to the end of their every sentence. It may be a case of commonality but not common causality... like.
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  7. #27
    discentes discentes is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by zippo222 View Post
    Er, no.
    You don't think an accent in Ireland and the UK often does as stated? I thought the second link in the OP was a good example of that being the case in Ireland:

    Supraregional Irish English | Dialect Blog

    Off the top of my head, in the UK, David Attenborough is from Leicester, but could be from absolutely anywhere in the UK. Here's Rowan Williams, a Welsh speaker from Wales, his English accent gives no indication of where he was brought up:

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  8. #28
    edg edg is offline
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    Most societies have a working class and a more posher accent.

    The conclusion of the author?

    There are posh and working class people!

    I hope no money was spent on their research
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  9. #29
    gerhard dengler gerhard dengler is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seanie Lemass View Post
    Good point Cookie regarding difference between parents and offspring. A typical Dublin middle class accent to me would be Gay Byrne or even Brian O'Driscoll in someone younger (which makes the 'amaze balls ad quite funny

    Most working class Dubs of older generation would have harsher accent than Byrnes but not that different really. Brendan Behan would be good example, and he was hamming it up!

    Outsiders often too mistake the scanger junkie scumbag Dublin accent for Dublin working class which it is not. No-one I know speaks like that!
    My parents generation have Dublin accents, the accents which you refer to.

    What I notice is that the majority of those people and their generation are excellent speakers (even though they might not consider themselves to be good speakers).
    Another thing is that very few of them swear when speaking.

    I love our Dublin accent.
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  10. #30
    CookieMonster CookieMonster is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    Can we knock this on the head! Of course you do. Everyone has an accent. You must speak like someone.
    In terms of yje kind of easily identifiable accent discussed in this thread, I don't. I live outside Ireland so therefore I have an "Irish" accent, but back home I don't have a Dublin accent or a culchie accent or whatever. But I speak right proper like.

    I'm not sure how you can say it's nothing to do with class. It's your friends's kids that have the affected accent, presuming all your friends are middle class, it's not working class kids that are taking like that.
    Yes, they are middle class, but they don't talk like that. Their children have developed it themselves, not from their parents. Well spoken people from South Dublin above the age of 35 generally don't talk like Miriam O'Callaghan (ironically Miriam O'Callaghan being the notable exception!) and the cohort of younger children/adults who do is from a much wider geographical base than South County Dublin and includes "working class" children.
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