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  1. #181
    Mitsui2 Mitsui2 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by leftsoc View Post
    Is the aggression in the working class speech or the imagination of middle class listeners?

    Did anyone hear the middle class author who, unchallenged, casually used the phrase 'scumbag Dubliner' on Joe Duffy today. Shame on Joe for letting it go. I suppose the silly salary has finally effected his brain.
    Who was it, leftsoc, and what was the context? I'm honestly dead curious.
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  2. #182
    nationalsday nationalsday is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinemartin View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeXjlYl_U_0

    some great Dublin accents in this.
    There's definitely a difference between Northside and Southside accents. The Southside Dublin accent doesn't have the bootboy/slightly menacing edge. I don't know how to explain it - there is a bit of ponciness about the Southside accent i.e it just isn't tough enough i.e think about Don Baker in "In the Name Of the Father" - Northside Whitehall-upbringing for serious, sinister Dublin heavy
    Last edited by nationalsday; 20th December 2013 at 02:46 AM.
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  3. #183
    Roisin3 Roisin3 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    Cork too, btw. The second link has a clip of JRM's supraregional accent. Britain has similar with RP, but I can't imagine as scenario in America where two people who grow up in the same area and work in the same area etc., end up with accent's as wildly different as JRM and Cillian Murphy:


    JRM has probably lost his native accent early through a combination of the parts he plays and where he lives and who he hangs out with.

    Some people I know will pick up a new accent within an hour of talking to someone with that accent. They're not being pretentious or superficial, it's just a tendency some people have. Otherwise we wouldn't have different accents at all if no-one ever changed theirs from the year dot.
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  4. #184
    Toasty Toasty is offline

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    Interesting thread. My dad was sent to elocution lessons by his mam when he was a nipper. His accent actually changes depending on who he's talking to and the subject matter of what he's talking about can have the same effect. It's almost like there's a dramatisation of every situation and he unconsciously gets into character to suit it. I'm convinced that the elocution must have had something to do with that. When you catch him on the fly and he needs to make an immediate response to something, he reverts to a Dublin accent but a lot of the time, it's very animated and the effect of the speech drills come out. It used to embarrass me because he sounded so posh much of the time and he was always correcting people's pronunciation but you get used to it, kind of. His brother, who didn't get sent to the lessons, has a such an obvious Dublin accent that it's hard to believe they're brothers.
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  5. #185
    Colin M Colin M is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Deere 5820 View Post
    Ye should heard some of the bull************************ that goes on down the country about big houses and small houses , people who are considered nice or rough, the car you drive, how many houses you own, how much land you have, your family etc etc etc
    Small town snobbery is the worst. John Waters 'Jiving at the Crossroads' years ago had a good insight into the social categories of small town Ireland. Though the book is over 20 years old. Whatever one thinks of Waters these days. TV/media have devoted a lot of attention to the 'Damo and Ivor' extremes of Dublin, but it is interesting to learn about what goes on at a more local level. The fact that a lot of young people (esp girls) from outside of Dublin try to 'modify' their accent in adulthood, says it all about the social insecurity of many from outside the Pale.
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  6. #186
    McTell McTell is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    //

    So, what do the posters of P.ie think? Is the wide variation of accent in Dublin indicative of social inequality/isolation? //

    If you're isolated you'll have a different accent?

    I love it when Dubs add in a vowel. Like the cabbie who told me about the olympics: "Oi do love de gym-en-as-tics".

    A-hem-en to dat.
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  7. #187
    Seanie Lemass Seanie Lemass is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by McTell View Post
    If you're isolated you'll have a different accent?

    I love it when Dubs add in a vowel. Like the cabbie who told me about the olympics: "Oi do love de gym-en-as-tics".

    A-hem-en to dat.

    Did he ever go to the azoo?

    I love the old Dublin accent but it is dying out. Not so much the accent but the argot. Listening to my granny and her sisters talking was like listening to Finnegans Wake!
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  8. #188
    Trampas Trampas is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toasty View Post
    Interesting thread. My dad was sent to elocution lessons by his mam when he was a nipper. His accent actually changes depending on who he's talking to .............

    Very irritating...........but of course Cork people do that all the time.
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  9. #189
    Seanie Lemass Seanie Lemass is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trampas View Post
    Very irritating...........but of course Cork people do that all the time.

    I have relatives who have three different accents. One (working class Dub) for family and friends; a neutral sort of Newstalk accent for when they are not quite certain who they are talking to; and ridiculous mid Atlantic version for work! It is quite disturbing!


    Some people like to take the pis$ out of Imelda May but that is how Dub women used to speak. My granny's family were Liberties, just up road from Imelda's. Nothing false about it at all. It is truly beautiful to listen to. Same as any local dialects but they are dying out. Nothing at all to do with the stereotype "howya bud". It is the language of Swift and O'Casey and Joyce.
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  10. #190
    linny55 linny55 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin M View Post
    Small town snobbery is the worst. John Waters 'Jiving at the Crossroads' years ago had a good insight into the social categories of small town Ireland. Though the book is over 20 years old. Whatever one thinks of Waters these days. TV/media have devoted a lot of attention to the 'Damo and Ivor' extremes of Dublin, but it is interesting to learn about what goes on at a more local level. The fact that a lot of young people (esp girls) from outside of Dublin try to 'modify' their accent in adulthood, says it all about the social insecurity of many from outside the Pale.
    Bull , nothing to do with insecurity , just aping the latest TV show, Dubs would never do that of course. The originial accent changers back in the late 70's early 80's , weekend snobs as they were called when going to the disco.
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