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  1. #91
    gatsbygirl20 gatsbygirl20 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    Either that or it's just code-switching. I had no problem when I was living in the States between the Irish accent I used for work/with my American girlfriend/roomates etc., and the Irish accent I used with other ex-pats. Obviously switching lexicon with such ease is a tad harder (for really common words like cell hone, trash can etc. I never switched back and used them even wehn I was back visiting Ireland), but it can also be done
    Camille Paglia writes about this--the way that once we move on in life,--- geographically, psychologically, socially--we often segue or switch between the two worlds--the one where we used to live and the one where we live now

    And our accent maps this

    She gives an example of Oprah Winfrey who she says switches between her down-home birth accent and the accent of the new sophisticated media world that she now inhabits

    As an Italian immigrant herself, Paglia says she straddles the two worlds, the two accents--Italian and American, and she sees the same switching in other immigrants

    I find that as a culchie living for many, many years in Dublin, my accent becomes very "down home" when I get together with other culchies, or when I go back home to visit my mother, but I have a slight South Dublin drawl when I'm communicating in my day to day life here in Dublin
    It all feels perfectly natural to me...
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  2. #92
    eurlex eurlex is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    Second largest Polish population in the world outside Warsaw, so I'd imagine there was/is some lingustic difference between them and the Irish -Chicagoans, but it was sufficently subtle that I never picked up on it. There's a fair bit of marriage and mixing between the Polacks and Micks at this stage anyway!
    That could be one of the reasons you perceive only 3/4 Chicago accents. When I first moved to Scotland I could only hear one accent. It took me a long while to be able to pick out the different regional/local accents. Even after a good few years, there were subtleties of accent variation that I never noticed unless they were pointed out to me. It's probable that a native Chicagoan would be able to perceive a few more accents than even the most tuned-in immigrant.
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  3. #93
    The Field Marshal The Field Marshal is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sister Mercedes View Post
    When I first left Ireland, my accent had to change out of necessity. I didn't pronounce my TH's, so I was often either misunderstood or lampooned. So I consciously changed the way I spoke to pronounce every syllable fully. Nowadays I still do it out of habit, and it's called Posh.
    Posh?

    If you are out of that habit then you must be talking in a state of nudity.

    Its abundantly clear from your avatar that your not wearing anything under it.
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  4. #94
    sgtharper sgtharper is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard dengler View Post
    Only those born within the vicinity of Bow's (church) bells can be said to be Cockney
    Not quite I'm afraid:
    St Mary-le-Bow /ˌsəntˈmɛəriˈləˈboʊ/ is a historic church in the City of London[1] on the main east-west thoroughfare, Cheapside. According to tradition a true Cockney must be born within earshot of the sound of Bow Bells (which refers to this church's bells rather than St Mary and Holy Trinity, Bow Road, in Bow, which until the 19th century was an outlying village).
    Not a lot of people know that!
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  5. #95
    Q-Tours Q-Tours is offline
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    About 12 years ago, one of The Offspring was required to have a hurling helmet for GAA practice. So off we go to the local sports shop where the Young Wan behind the counter looks at him and says No, don't have his size, try Martin Junior on Henry Stree.

    [Scribbles down "Martin Junior"]

    .... and off we go to Henry St, which we traverse and re-traverse looking in vain for "Martin Jun . . ." - oh wait, hang on ....

    Marathon Junior

    Now there's a South Dublin accent for ya!
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  6. #96
    Sense 0f Wonder Sense 0f Wonder is offline

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    Almost daily in the US I am told: "Ooooh you have an accent!"

    To which I always reply: "So do you."

    Most people laugh at that and agree, but several times the response has been: "No I don't!"
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  7. #97
    oggy oggy is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by readytogo View Post
    Accents are fascinating. This Summer, while working in New York, I met a woman from Newfoundland. I was absolutely astonished when she told me where she was from. She spoke like she was from the south of Ireland (albeit with a hint of 'American'). She had never even visited Ireland in her life but her whole community on Newfoundland is of Irish descent and very proud of it.
    I had that experience in Toronto in 2000. Coming out of a shopping centre I asked a guy for directions. After he told me I asked what part of Ireland he was from. The mouth dropped when he said he was a Newfie, didnt believe him until my brother who is long term in Toronto came along and explained its a fact of life there. Fascinating to say the least
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  8. #98
    Clareman Clareman is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by discentes View Post
    Cork too, btw. The second link has a clip of JRM's supraregional accent. Britain has similar with RP, but I can't imagine as scenario in America where two people who grow up in the same area and work in the same area etc., end up with accent's as wildly different as JRM and Cillian Murphy:

    There can be massive differences in accent and pronunciation in broadly the same urban areas in the USA i.e. only a few streets apart in the same inner city, however the differences are almost exclusively based on race/ethnicity unlike in Ireland.
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  9. #99
    McDave McDave is offline

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    IMO the Dorsh/Deefer is an affectation designed to distinguish the speaker on a class basis. I can only imagine it being adopted in order to conform to get an 'in' with an affluent group. Prior to the 'D4' accent, the class-expression role was largely played by the West Brit accent. Now 'poshness' among teenies and twanty-something's comprises a mix between the aspirational British accent and the perceived trendiness of the Valley Girl, hard as it might be to believe. But then again, the influence of US media is pervasive in Ireland.

    That's how it sounds to my ear anyway!
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  10. #100
    Prester Jim Prester Jim is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by McDave View Post
    IMO the Dorsh/Deefer is an affectation designed to distinguish the speaker on a class basis. I can only imagine it being adopted in order to conform to get an 'in' with an affluent group. Prior to the 'D4' accent, the class-expression role was largely played by the West Brit accent. Now 'poshness' among teenies and twanty-something's comprises a mix between the aspirational British accent and the perceived trendiness of the Valley Girl, hard as it might be to believe. But then again, the influence of US media is pervasive in Ireland.

    That's how it sounds to my ear anyway!
    Largely agreed but I think we shouldn't lose sight of the fact that posh accents can be quite similar everywhere taking language into accounts.
    I remember Peter Ustinov was interviewed a long while ago and he said that the posh French accent is much the same as the psh English accent, at which point he did a very funny impersonation of both.
    A posh Irish person might well have sounded similar to what we have today in some respects even without the Imperial past.
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