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  1. #21
    gatsbygirl20 gatsbygirl20 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Analyzer View Post
    There is also a Dun Laoghaire accent. You hear it from older people resident in "the borough".

    It means "my money is older and more genuine than yours" (you little Terenure brat).
    Yep. Same in Rathgar. Very subtle but a clear class marker and hard for the arriviste to imitate exactly

    All my nephews and nieces born in any part of South Dublin in the last 15 years speak with the Dort accent and use its slang. But they're lovely kids really...
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  2. #22
    firefly123 firefly123 is online now
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    I think there are. 4 distinct dub accents

    1 the scobie. Lots of emphasis on the R and a complete lack of a T. As in 'I'm affer geddin me Labourrrrr money for me meh-I- done!'

    2 the dub. Occasional dropped T with a few y'knowherameanlikes thrown in. As in 'I fixed the leak in yer kitchen missus but it's gonna cost ya y'knowherameanlike.'

    3 the deefer. The I becomes king with some R extensions. A lot of loikes. As in 'MoIself and fionneog are loike totes going to see that flick. Yer woman is loike a total Rrrroide!'

    4 the trinner. Academic with lots of staccato speech and an almost American sound. Think Mary Robinson or any tweed wearing individual.
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  3. #23
    gatsbygirl20 gatsbygirl20 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefly123 View Post
    I think there are. 4 distinct dub accents

    1 the scobie. Lots of emphasis on the R and a complete lack of a T. As in 'I'm affer geddin me Labourrrrr money for me meh-I- done!'

    2 the dub. Occasional dropped T with a few y'knowherameanlikes thrown in. As in 'I fixed the leak in yer kitchen missus but it's gonna cost ya y'knowherameanlike.'

    3 the deefer. The I becomes king with some R extensions. A lot of loikes. As in 'MoIself and fionneog are loike totes going to see that flick. Yer woman is loike a total Rrrroide!'

    4 the trinner. Academic with lots of staccato speech and an almost American sound. Think Mary Robinson or any tweed wearing individual.
    And the Law Library....Don't forget the Law Library....
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  4. #24
    McDave McDave is offline

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    I can't get over how vile, self-regarding and phoney that accent is. Apart from the promissory notes and Ahern, for me it's the single worst thing to come out of the C****c T***r.

    I think the author is right. Pretty soon the mid-Atlantic 'deefer'/Dorsh doofuses will be middle aged, and frowned upon by the following generation for their association with the bubble and bling. What comes arind goes arind, eh?
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  5. #25
    Shpake Shpake is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cato View Post
    Here's one of those interesting little stories:

    'D4 dort accent will disappear after economic crisis', says language expert


    Read the article for yourself. His claim that the accent is affected seems accurate to me from my own experience. Several of my Dublin cousins developed that god-awful accent in their adult years, despite their own North-side origins.

    I've also come across Cork and Kerry people, and others from across the state, who adopted this accent after studying and/or working in Dublin. There is a kind of snobbery among many against any regional accent and a desire to have no accent at all - the result is dort-speak or some kind of weird mid-Atlantic barbarism.

    I'd be delighted if our current difficulties produced a few happy consequences (say, significant political reform - *sigh*) and if the death of this kind of contrived way of speaking was to be one of them, then all the better.
    Read this wrong at first. I thought poor D4 had passed on. House proices in Dublin on the roise. It killed him loik.
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  6. #26
    EvotingMachine0197 EvotingMachine0197 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munnkeyman View Post
    Do people really say 'Dubes'?
    Yes. Isn't it an diminutive of Dubarrys?
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  7. #27
    Munnkeyman Munnkeyman is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvotingMachine0197 View Post
    Yes. Isn't it an diminutive of Dubarrys?
    Urrrgghh!.! Yes, it apparently is.
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  8. #28
    soubresauts soubresauts is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radix View Post
    Never mind the Dort accent.

    Think of the Dun dorks please.


    Love it! The Dundalk accent is superior to the Drogheda accent, and anything is superior to Dortspeak, which, unfortunately, has infected much of Dublin and many other parts of Ireland.
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  9. #29
    ygargarin ygargarin is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefly123 View Post
    I think there are. 4 distinct dub accents

    1 the scobie. Lots of emphasis on the R and a complete lack of a T. As in 'I'm affer geddin me Labourrrrr money for me meh-I- done!'

    2 the dub. Occasional dropped T with a few y'knowherameanlikes thrown in. As in 'I fixed the leak in yer kitchen missus but it's gonna cost ya y'knowherameanlike.'

    3 the deefer. The I becomes king with some R extensions. A lot of loikes. As in 'MoIself and fionneog are loike totes going to see that flick. Yer woman is loike a total Rrrroide!'

    4 the trinner. Academic with lots of staccato speech and an almost American sound. Think Mary Robinson or any tweed wearing individual.
    Where does the "rindabite" pronunciation and the mangling of vowel sounds a la Rachel Allen fit into these 4 categories? Allen says "jum" for "jam", "batter" for "butter" and "ram" for "rum". I particularly remember her ram and almond cake recipe.

    I'm guessing she's in the deefer category but can't imagine her say "loike".
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  10. #30
    EvotingMachine0197 EvotingMachine0197 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munnkeyman View Post
    Urrrgghh!.! Yes, it apparently is.
    The kids all call them Dubes and they're quite popular with girl's school uniforms. But I can understand your disdain.
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