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  1. #321
    futurelost futurelost is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRealityOnTheGround View Post
    I grow up reading about how bleak and miserable Ireland was in the 80s. So to posters with vivid memories of the 80's: are things as bad now? One can look at statistics like unemployment (which is now not quite as bad as back then) but I am more interested in getting an idea of the mood and spirit at the time. I get a sense a lot of people at the moment are clinging to the hope that thing things will turn around, but it does not always work like that (one example being Argentina which 100 years ago was one of the richest countries in the world, but then went on to have a lost century).
    Some of us...in the 70s and 80s were lucky to have jobs; I was one...but I can tell you...I worked my ass off !
    Throughout the 80s I worked an average of 80 hours a week....no joke! This meant a split shift....starting at various times from 1.30 in the morning...finishing at 10.30 at night....to other shifts starting at 5 in the morning till 7 in the evening!!
    Much of the population would, then, not do this work...so, as you've heard for years....there was a lot of emigration. I was one of the few who didn't emigrate because I had a family to look after. There were many like me....but we weren't then...nor are we now.....appreciated by those govts....by those who left....or by this govt.....and those who weren't even born then.
    This is not to say things were harder then....I even think, somehow they were easier...because we were so busy earning a crust...and we didn't have the internet/media/possibility to confront/comparisons that present-day people have!
    In many ways it's harder now...because the stark contrast between the 'haves' and 'have nots'....is all the more apparent....and there are so many educated people now who have no recourse to emigration...like we had in the 70s, 80s.
    I have nothing but sympathy for the youth now....and the future....God knows...globally? Hope I expressed my thoughts as well as I intended. v/interesting OP/thread. Thanks.
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  2. #322
    oggy oggy is offline
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    Whats the story, didnt you all vote FG/Lab to reverse everything FF did ? At this stage your genius decision should have you oozing with confidence about the future. Okay there has been a slight delay on the 100000 jobs starting but you can bet your gods in power already have an outline of where the second 100000 will come from. Before we know where we are the immigrants will be coming in their droves again. Bunch of blasted wimps yis are ?
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  3. #323
    gatsbygirl20 gatsbygirl20 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by tokkie View Post
    Sorry Gatsby but with all due respect I am failing to see the hardship here. This continues today for some, perhaps many. My Dad worked on the sites in London in the 1950s to the 1970s. He remembers Irish men being told that their mother/father had died that morning, the day before etc. The men, unable to afford any flight of any description or to even borrow the money, just carried on working. He remembers other men being told that their mother had died and been buried the previous week.

    I am not saying it was hardship---just making the comparison, as the OP intended.

    In a family emergency today Mummy would probably pay for the kid's flight by credit card, and it would be cheaper anyway.

    I forget what that Aer Lingus flight from Paris cost, but I remember my total shock. It would have been like asking somebody today for 2K for a flight, I guess. My parents were too poor to help. I had earned my own money since the age of 15, and could not imagine asking them for money.

    As for the Irish men on the sites of London....All my uncles worked all their lives in the 40s, 50s and 60s on the English building sites. They all came home for family funerals, dressed up, keeping up appearances. They all seemed to have far more money than the struggling peasant farmers at home, but perhaps some of that was bravado...

    I totally believe the story about the man on the building site being told his mother was dead and buried....

    One thing we may be missing here is how much harsher and more cruel life was in the past. There was no time for sentimentality or softness. Things that would have people hopping mad on Liveline these days---neglect, insensitivity around death or grief, physical punishment etc---were taken as a normal part of life in the past.. (although for me the 80s are not the "real past")

    I remember a nun trying to comfort a bereaved child whose sister had died (a rare thing for nuns to do in those days) by telling him to "offer it up for the Holy Souls, and remember that will be one less child your mother will have to try to clothe and feed. Never forget ye are poor people, but just as long as your little sister has no Mortal Sin on her soul, she will be spared the fires of Hell"

    This was in the early 60s.

    I don't really expect anyone to believe it, but it was such a normal thing for a nun to say at the time, that nobody remarked on it. And because the nun was quite a kind old creature compared to the other cruel monster-nuns, the child was temporarily comforted....
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  4. #324
    futurelost futurelost is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by gatsbygirl20 View Post
    I am not saying it was hardship---just making the comparison, as the OP intended.

    In a family emergency today Mummy would probably pay for the kid's flight by credit card, and it would be cheaper anyway.

    I forget what that Aer Lingus flight from Paris cost, but I remember my total shock. It would have been like asking somebody today for 2K for a flight, I guess. My parents were too poor to help. I had earned my own money since the age of 15, and could not imagine asking them for money.

    As for the Irish men on the sites of London....All my uncles worked all their lives in the 40s, 50s and 60s on the English building sites. They all came home for family funerals, dressed up, keeping up appearances. They all seemed to have far more money than the struggling peasant farmers at home, but perhaps some of that was bravado...

    I totally believe the story about the man on the building site being told his mother was dead and buried....

    One thing we may be missing here is how much harsher and more cruel life was in the past. There was no time for sentimentality or softness. Things that would have people hopping mad on Liveline these days---neglect, insensitivity around death or grief, physical punishment etc---were taken as a normal part of life in the past.. (although for me the 80s are not the "real past")

    I remember a nun trying to comfort a bereaved child whose sister had died (a rare thing for nuns to do in those days) by telling him to "offer it up for the Holy Souls, and remember that will be one less child your mother will have to try to clothe and feed. Never forget ye are poor people, but just as long as your little sister has no Mortal Sin on her soul, she will be spared the fires of Hell"

    This was in the early 60s.

    I don't really expect anyone to believe it, but it was such a normal thing for a nun to say at the time, that nobody remarked on it. And because the nun was quite a kind old creature compared to the other cruel monster-nuns, the child was temporarily comforted....
    gatsbygirl20.....'they' are too young to remember...were not born, many of them....and probably a significant number belong to a section of society that have never/will never have to deal with real hardship; kinda the real story of Ireland isn't it.....rather than a classless society...we are 'digressing' to a supremely class-oriented society....which, as you'll observed, quite a few posters promote?
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  5. #325
    futurelost futurelost is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by gatsbygirl20 View Post
    I am not saying it was hardship---just making the comparison, as the OP intended.

    In a family emergency today Mummy would probably pay for the kid's flight by credit card, and it would be cheaper anyway.

    I forget what that Aer Lingus flight from Paris cost, but I remember my total shock. It would have been like asking somebody today for 2K for a flight, I guess. My parents were too poor to help. I had earned my own money since the age of 15, and could not imagine asking them for money.

    As for the Irish men on the sites of London....All my uncles worked all their lives in the 40s, 50s and 60s on the English building sites. They all came home for family funerals, dressed up, keeping up appearances. They all seemed to have far more money than the struggling peasant farmers at home, but perhaps some of that was bravado...

    I totally believe the story about the man on the building site being told his mother was dead and buried....

    One thing we may be missing here is how much harsher and more cruel life was in the past. There was no time for sentimentality or softness. Things that would have people hopping mad on Liveline these days---neglect, insensitivity around death or grief, physical punishment etc---were taken as a normal part of life in the past.. (although for me the 80s are not the "real past")

    I remember a nun trying to comfort a bereaved child whose sister had died (a rare thing for nuns to do in those days) by telling him to "offer it up for the Holy Souls, and remember that will be one less child your mother will have to try to clothe and feed. Never forget ye are poor people, but just as long as your little sister has no Mortal Sin on her soul, she will be spared the fires of Hell"

    This was in the early 60s.

    I don't really expect anyone to believe it, but it was such a normal thing for a nun to say at the time, that nobody remarked on it. And because the nun was quite a kind old creature compared to the other cruel monster-nuns, the child was temporarily comforted....
    gatsbygirl20.....'they' are too young to remember...were not born, many of them....and probably a significant number belong to a section of society that have never/will never have to deal with real hardship; kinda the real story of Ireland isn't it.....rather than a classless society...we are 'digressing' to a supremely class-oriented society....which, as you'll observed, quite a few posters promote?
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