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  1. #571
    Cnoc a Leassa Cnoc a Leassa is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strawberry View Post
    No, its coming from 10 Downing St, I'll bet. This is the Chequers deal re-spun as a climbdown offer from the EU. Kite flying in other words.
    Seems like a reheat of the Ivan Rogers original proposal for a solution with a few lines to suggest split between member states and trying to driving a wedge between member states and Brussels.

    Rogers proposal - Perhaps the EU backs down and allows single market access or membership while permitting the end of free movement. If there is any capacity left to fudge even more, this is where to look. There are plenty of routes whereby the British could have slowed immigration from the EU. That they never availed of them is a mystery. Perhaps they will now start, calling it ‘an end to free movement’. The EU will, by contrast, just observe the new application of old rules and be happy that the four freedoms of the single market are still being honoured. In this scenario, the hard Brexiteers have to accept Britain staying aligned with the single market. The bone that is tossed to them is a sort-of end to free movement. Will that be enough for them? I can’t see the EU agreeing to anything that is called the end of free movement. If that opinion is wrong, the Brexiteers are unlikely to be satisfied with a solution that still involves ongoing British payments into the EU budget and the jurisdiction of the ECJ.
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  2. #572
    gracethepirate gracethepirate is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cnoc a Leassa View Post
    Seems like a reheat of the Ivan Rogers original proposal for a solution with a few lines to suggest split between member states and trying to driving a wedge between member states and Brussels.

    Rogers proposal - Perhaps the EU backs down and allows single market access or membership while permitting the end of free movement. If there is any capacity left to fudge even more, this is where to look. There are plenty of routes whereby the British could have slowed immigration from the EU. That they never availed of them is a mystery. Perhaps they will now start, calling it ‘an end to free movement’. The EU will, by contrast, just observe the new application of old rules and be happy that the four freedoms of the single market are still being honoured. In this scenario, the hard Brexiteers have to accept Britain staying aligned with the single market. The bone that is tossed to them is a sort-of end to free movement. Will that be enough for them? I can’t see the EU agreeing to anything that is called the end of free movement. If that opinion is wrong, the Brexiteers are unlikely to be satisfied with a solution that still involves ongoing British payments into the EU budget and the jurisdiction of the ECJ.
    Must be embarrassing for Theresa who as Home Secretary apparently did not know the EU's free movement rules, or didn't apply them, and was constantly chagrined about her inability to stop some immigrants. Well, I guess applying those rules may help with a supposed fudge now that may appease some of the brexiteers, and the CBI can still get the migration it wants post-brexit.
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  3. #573
    wexfordman wexfordman is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by gracethepirate View Post
    I am surprised:
    (1) Boris Johnson isn't working for the Express
    (2) There are no rules in place for preventing the publication of fake news, especially in a major (possibly influential) daily newspaper.
    That rag is sold in our local tesco's, I am seriously considering gathering a list of the racist anti irish bile that newspaper and its commentators are posting up and asking Tesco what the hell are they doing supporting and condoning this sort of stuff.
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  4. #574
    jams odonnell jams odonnell is offline
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    This is a great result for Britain. We can stay in a Single Market for Goods and continue to buy German cars. We will be free to set our own standards for services, which will allow us sell financial services to the Commonwealth instead of the EU. Dr Fox is insisting that all Commonwealth countries revert to GMT. This will help us sell financial services that work well in their financial markets.

    Hearts and Minds of British Steel.
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  5. #575
    gracethepirate gracethepirate is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by jams odonnell View Post
    This is a great result for Britain. We can stay in a Single Market for Goods and continue to buy German cars. We will be free to set our own standards for services, which will allow us sell financial services to the Commonwealth instead of the EU. Dr Fox is insisting that all Commonwealth countries revert to GMT. This will help us sell financial services that work well in their financial markets.

    Hearts and Minds of British Steel.
    That's just about right. Midnight in NZ but the clock says Midday. G'day.

    Just shows how genius the brexit mind is.
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  6. #576
    Cai Cai is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by jams odonnell View Post
    This is a great result for Britain. We can stay in a Single Market for Goods and continue to buy German cars. We will be free to set our own standards for services, which will allow us sell financial services to the Commonwealth instead of the EU. Dr Fox is insisting that all Commonwealth countries revert to GMT. This will help us sell financial services that work well in their financial markets.

    Hearts and Minds of British Steel.
    I wonder if he’ll tell them to revert to sterling - after we change back to pounds, shillings & pence of course.
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  7. #577
    gracethepirate gracethepirate is offline
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    If you are living in the UK should you start preparing for brexit now? Sounds like a good idea to be cautious

    'I'm already stockpiling': readers preparing for a messy Brexit


    Britain could run out of food by this time next year if it cannot maintain the flow of goods after Brexit, the National Farmers’ Union has said. After it emerged that the government was drawing up plans to stockpile food in the event of a no-deal Brexit, the British Retail Consortium and drug manufacturers issued more warnings about possible supply shortages, we asked for your views.

    About 300 readers got in touch, with more than half saying they had already started stockpiling or were seriously considering doing so, and the rest sharing their concerns about shortages after a no-deal Brexit. The most popular food items people wanted to store were staples such as flour, olive oil, dried pasta, rice, powdered milk, coffee and tinned items such as tomatoes and sardines. Many readers also highlighted “luxuries” such as chocolate, and there was mention of stocking up on over-the-counter medicines such as painkillers and antihistamines.


    The article continues with comments from several readers. The subheads and one comment:


    • ‘The probability is tiny but the consequences are truly terrible’


    • ‘What exactly is the government going to stockpile, and where?’

    There are too many people who seem to have forgotten about (or are too young to remember) the late 1970s and early 80s – 3 million unemployed, serious economic dislocation, and riots stemming from deprivation mixed with a simmering frustration and fury at an out-of-touch government.

    We also seem to have enough idiots at the helm who are quite willing to drive this country off an economic cliff-edge, knowing that they personally have good financial cushions to land on and who really aren’t bothered about the “collateral damage” they’ll inflict on others. Plus I don’t think they really understand the practicalities of how goods, including food, are distributed and/or stored these days. I mean, what exactly is the government going to stockpile and where? I don’t believe this country has the capacity to stockpile any serious food supplies. David Bates, 54, Bermondsey

    • ‘Who’s going to feed us if Brexit does all go pear-shaped? It’s an insurance policy of sorts’


    • ‘If I have to, I’ll dig up my garden and grow my own fresh veg’


    • ‘I am planning to buy a two to three month supply of staples’


    • ‘I have a son to support and can’t afford to be caught up in panic buying’


    • ‘I’m not panicking about Brexit but I am taking it seriously’
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  8. #578
    robut robut is offline

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    Hard Brexit, No Deal and the Northern Ireland Backstop: What Next for Brexit Negotiations?

    A snippet:

    Brexit is like a Rubik’s Cube; it is multifaceted, complicated and frustrating. The process of negotiating a favourable UK-EU future relationship at the same time as the terms of withdrawal was always going to be a difficult undertaking. The European Council meeting in October is crucial as it will attempt to finalise the UK’s Withdrawal Agreement – the legal basis for UK-EU relations on ‘Brexit Day’ on the 29th March 2019. However, according to a recent survey by the UK in a Changing Europe’s Brexit Policy Panel 64% of academics believe that it is unlikely the UK and the EU will reach a deal on the Withdrawal Agreement at the European Council meeting in October as a consequence of the Irish border question and internal divisions in UK politics. In addition, nearly five out of ten (4.7 to be exact) of those experts believe that the UK will leave the EU with No Deal. Yet, perhaps more pertinent are the findings that a plurality of the Brexit Policy Panel believes that the border between the UK and the EU is in fact likely to be on the island of Ireland. This is despite a legal commitment between both the UK and the EU that there will be no hard border on the island of Ireland.
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  9. #579
    robut robut is offline

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    Brexit plans could see mile-wide stop and search zone along border

    Members of the public could be stopped, searched and detained within a mile-wide strip of the border under new legislation planned by the British government.

    The controversial powers are contained in the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill which is currently working its way through Westminster.

    If the bill becomes law any member of the public could be stopped within a mile of the border to establish if they are entering or leaving the north.

    The new proposals have already passed committee stage at Westminster and some observers believe could be law by Christmas - just months before Brexit is due to kick in.
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  10. #580
    Spanner Island Spanner Island is offline
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    Yep... I can see this idea working out really well...

    I'd say those living within a mile of the border will be particularly thrilled at the prospect...
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