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  1. #51
    Uganda Uganda is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by bogtrotter View Post
    Sinn Fein are a 32 county party...
    of which 26 are in the republic of ireland, and the balance in the United Kingdom.
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  2. #52
    PO'Neill PO'Neill is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uganda View Post
    of which 26 are in the republic of Ireland, and the balance in the occupied counties.
    Fixed for ya but what else would you expect from the south's wing of the Tory party -

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  3. #53
    LookWhoItIs LookWhoItIs is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uganda View Post
    Sf are the third party in the republic of ireland. They are the sixth largest party in the United Kingdom.

    Saying they are the biggest party in Ireland is meaningless - its a bit like saying the democrats are the biggest party in the landmass of North America. So what?
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  4. #54
    TruthInTheNews TruthInTheNews is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by TruthInTheNews View Post
    The word from London is that Sinn Fein will push for devolved powers for Northern Ireland and membership of the Eurpean Economic Area in order to lessen the pain of Brexit.

    The EEA provides for the free movement of persons, goods, services and capital within the European Single Market. All EEA countries adopt most EU legislation concerning the single market, notable exclusions being laws regarding agriculture and fisheries.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Economic_Area

    The Northern Ireland Act 1998 allows for the transfer of powers to NI including the right to negotiate relations with the EU, which are currently excluded under Schedule 2.

    Northern Ireland Act 1998

    Sinn Fein believe that membership of the EEA and devolved powers are the only way to preserve the existing border arrangements and minimise the impact of Brexit. Special arrangements will have to be made for agriculture such as excepting NI farmers from EAA restrictions. Dublin would need to apply pressure on the EU to gain concessions.

    Sinn Fein have sounded out opinions from other parties in NI. All are supportive bar the DUP which is opposed idea of more devolved powers for NI as they believe devolution weakens the Union.
    The Sinn Fein Office in London has been pushing hard for devolution behind the scenes and their efforts have begun to bear fruit. FG and senior officials in the Department of Foreign Affairs have agreed to adopt the SF strategy. FF have been left out of the loop.

    The Tories are privately in favour of devolution to allow NI stay in the Customs Union but the DUP are bitterly opposed to any form of devolution that weakens the link with the UK. The Labour Party have given in principle support for more devolved powers for NI. Only the DUP now stands in the way of a settlement.

    The Tories have accepted that the Irish Government will never accept the imposition of passport controls at the border and will instead will impose passport controls at airports and ferry terminals in NI to prevent EU citizens crossing into Britain unchecked. The DUP have agreed to this proposal but have not announced anything publicly.

    Sinn Fein, the Tories and FG have agreed on a strategy to pressure the DUP into a deal. The Irish Government will threaten to veto any proposed trade deal between the EU and Britain unless the DUP agrees to the devolution of powers under Northern Ireland Act 1998 which will allow NI to negotiate trade terms with the EU and implement EU regulations in the territory. DUP refuseniks will be accused of threatening the future of the UK by triggering a hard Brexit which will have disastrous consequences for the UK economy. Even hard core Brexiteers have come to the conclusion that the UK cannot leave the EU without a trade deal in place. This is why the Tories have agreed to a forty billion pound+ divorce bill. The Tories will threaten to hold a referendum in NI on whether the territory will stay in the Customs Union. This idea has already been floated by Charles Tannock. The betting is that the DUP will blink and back down especially if the EU allows NI farmers access to the EU market and CAP funding which is not normally allowed under custom union rules.

    The expectation is that the Irish Govenment will indeed veto the trade deal and that there will be a referrendum in NI early next year on the customs union question. The DUP cannot continue to oppose devolution if the referendum is passed and the expectation is that the referendum will pass.
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  5. #55
    antidistinctlyminty (ADM) antidistinctlyminty (ADM) is offline
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    There hasn't been an Assembly up North for about ten months - how can this continue with Brexit looming
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  6. #56
    TruthInTheNews TruthInTheNews is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by antidistinctlyminty (ADM) View Post
    There hasn't been an Assembly up North for about ten months - how can this continue with Brexit looming
    The DUP may hold the balance of power at Westminster but they cannot afford pull the plug on the Tories because Corbyn will become Prime Minister. Corbyn is pro Sinn Fein as evidenced by past pronouncements and his appointment of a Sinn Fein staffer, Jayne Fisher to his office last year. Corbyn will push hard for a United Ireland so really the DUP don't hold any cards at all. They are in fact in a weak position. The Tories know this and will call their bluff.
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  7. #57
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is online now
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    The DUP are unlikely to agree to a customs border in the Irish Sea.
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  8. #58
    TruthInTheNews TruthInTheNews is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    The DUP are unlikely to agree to a customs border in the Irish Sea.
    They will if the alternative is a Corbyn led pro Sinn Fein Labour Government.

    Wiser heads than Arlene know that a substantial number of Unionists rejected Brexit and that a substantial number of Unionists would accept a customs border in the Irish sea. This may have long term implications for the DUP if these Unionists start voting Alliance Party in response to DUP intransigence.
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  9. #59
    TruthInTheNews TruthInTheNews is offline

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    The DUP have sabotaged the Customs Union proposals. The Irish Government will now go to plan B. Varadkar will insist on regulatory convergence. May will be forced to call the DUP bluff. The alternative is no trade deal. If the DUP withdraw support then May will call a snap election. The election will be used to test public attitudes to Brexit now that the ramifications of leaving the EU have become clear. Sinn Fein will use the election to destroy the DUP in NI. Moderate Unionists will desert the DUP and vote Official Unionist or Alliance. This will will split the Unionist vote. SF will become the largest party in Northern Ireland and dominate Stormont. The UK general election will result in Labour government or a Labour/Lib Dem coalition with a mandate for a soft Brexit. Britain will stay in the Customs Unions. Border Problem solved.

    On the other hand if the DUP back down then May will ensure that Britain stays in the Customs Union or agrees to arrangements that have the same effect. There will be no hard border.

    It will be win/win for the Irish Government and Sinn Fein.
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  10. #60
    Kadelistan Kadelistan is offline
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    Absolutely not. How could a part of a larger country retain membership in the European Economic Area at all?
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