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  1. #5001
    Tribal Tribal is online now

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    And for many more years to come by the looks of it.
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  2. #5002
    blinding blinding is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tribal View Post


    And for many more years to come by the looks of it.
    Its time to Farage it once and for all...........
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  3. #5003
    Deadlock Deadlock is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by blinding View Post
    Its time to Farage it once and for all...........
    You have it SO bad for him. Someone is going to need a restraining order ...
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  4. #5004
    Tribal Tribal is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by blinding View Post
    Its time to Farage it once and for all...........
    Unfortunately Farage's superpower is useless against the EU as they've got rocks of kryptonite reality!

    However as in the original movie he could still save Britain from reality by flying around the earth fast enough to switch its rotation and reverse time to bring Britain back to 1900!

    SuperNige to the reeeeeescue!
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  5. #5005
    Deadlock Deadlock is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tribal View Post
    Unfortunately Farage's superpower is useless against the EU as they've got rocks of kryptonite reality!

    However as in the original movie he could still save Britain from reality by flying around the earth fast enough to switch its rotation and reverse time to bring Britain back to 1700!

    SuperNige to the reeeeeescue!
    Fixed that for ya!
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  6. #5006
    Filibuster Filibuster is offline

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    I think at this stage Ireland needs to adopt an attitude of self-preservation and basically take every opportunity to ensure that Irish interests are put first in this process and that means aggressively going after any business opportunities Brexit might generate.

    If we're too accommodating to the UK we run the risk of being dragged along for the Brexit ride, and I suspect it's going to be a very bumpy one.

    The notion that Ireland should leave the EU and join the UK on some kind of Brexit adventure is absolute nonsense. Our history with the UK would indicate that they would probably throw us under the bus the moment that we were seen as any kind of competitor. We would be back to trying to ride on the UK's coat tails and picking up crumbs from the floor.
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  7. #5007
    Prof Honeydew Prof Honeydew is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sync View Post
    There's enough Tories standing up saying they won't vote for the bill to make this a problem to get through.
    Most of the criticism of the Great Repeal Bill in the House of Commons today centred around the authority it grants the British government to establish legal regulation by executive order. The opposition to these so-called Henry VIII powers comes from a number of sources including:
    - Anti-Brexiteers looking for any way to derail the Great Repeal Bill
    - Opposition parties trying to discredit the Tories
    - SNP, Plaid Cymru and other Scottish and Welsh MPs trying to prevent Westminster hijacking powers that should instead be the responsibilities of devolved administrations
    - Brexiteers worried about May's government wilting under EU pressure to soften the hard Brexit they crave
    - Individual MPs spanning the entire spectrum concerned about weakening Parliament's authority over government
    - Sht-stirrers looking for a cause to cling to
    - Tory backbenchers acting as proxies for contenders in an anticipated contest to replace May as party leader and Prime Minister

    Taken together, they'd constitute a majority of the House of Commons - although that isn't to say enough of them would overcome party loyalties and all vote together on one crunch issue to knock out the government. However, the Cabinet is aware of the possibility and is almost certain to agree to some compromise that might involve greater parliamentary oversight, increased devolution of responsibilities to Scotland and Wales, adoption of a British Charter of Rights along the lines of the European one etc. If they were smart about it, a generous concession to MPs' concerns would take the wind from the sails of most opponents and, by taking the lead with such a magnanimous gesture, might even enhance the government's standing.

    However, that only addresses domestic concerns. The real difficulty with the Great Repeal Bill as it currently stands is that it makes it impossible for Britain to conclude a post-Brexit deal with the EU. And unfortunately, it appears to matter to only a small minority of MPs. As far as the majority are concerned, the sanctity of Parliament, respecting the Brexit result, reclaiming Britain's sovereignty, re-installing British values, shutting up stroppy Scots and Welsh etc, far outweigh anything that might upset Johnny Foreigner.

    Even though these mostly cosmetic gestures complicate the mechanics of withdrawing from the EU, May's government will concede to the wishes of the Great British Public as expressed in the Mother of Parliaments. In fact, they'll even milk it to the last to show how determined they were to reach a mutually beneficial arrangement with an intransigent EU. But they won't budge an inch on what the Great Repeal Bill is really about, the hell-bent obsession with removing all engagement with EU authority regardless of the cost.

    And if today's opening jousts on the Bill's Second Reading are anything to go by, they'll get away with it. Labour will claim victory on parliamentary oversight, some loudmouths on the Tory right will brag about how they preserved the purity of Brexit, some Remainers will find solace in winning some insignificant amendments, a few committed Tory Remainers will sacrifice their careers by rebelling but they'll be cancelled out by dogmatic Labour Brexiteers and the odd MP panicking over reaction in their overwhelmingly pro-Brexit constituency. But the meat of the Great Repeal Bill will survive.
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  8. #5008
    gracethepirate gracethepirate is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof Honeydew View Post
    Most of the criticism of the Great Repeal Bill in the House of Commons today centred around the authority it grants the British government to establish legal regulation by executive order. The opposition to these so-called Henry VIII powers comes from a number of sources including:
    - Anti-Brexiteers looking for any way to derail the Great Repeal Bill
    - Opposition parties trying to discredit the Tories
    - SNP, Plaid Cymru and other Scottish and Welsh MPs trying to prevent Westminster hijacking powers that should instead be the responsibilities of devolved administrations
    - Brexiteers worried about May's government wilting under EU pressure to soften the hard Brexit they crave
    - Individual MPs spanning the entire spectrum concerned about weakening Parliament's authority over government
    - Sht-stirrers looking for a cause to cling to
    - Tory backbenchers acting as proxies for contenders in an anticipated contest to replace May as party leader and Prime Minister

    Taken together, they'd constitute a majority of the House of Commons - although that isn't to say enough of them would overcome party loyalties and all vote together on one crunch issue to knock out the government. However, the Cabinet is aware of the possibility and is almost certain to agree to some compromise that might involve greater parliamentary oversight, increased devolution of responsibilities to Scotland and Wales, adoption of a British Charter of Rights along the lines of the European one etc. If they were smart about it, a generous concession to MPs' concerns would take the wind from the sails of most opponents and, by taking the lead with such a magnanimous gesture, might even enhance the government's standing.

    However, that only addresses domestic concerns. The real difficulty with the Great Repeal Bill as it currently stands is that it makes it impossible for Britain to conclude a post-Brexit deal with the EU. And unfortunately, it appears to matter to only a small minority of MPs. As far as the majority are concerned, the sanctity of Parliament, respecting the Brexit result, reclaiming Britain's sovereignty, re-installing British values, shutting up stroppy Scots and Welsh etc, far outweigh anything that might upset Johnny Foreigner.

    Even though these mostly cosmetic gestures complicate the mechanics of withdrawing from the EU, May's government will concede to the wishes of the Great British Public as expressed in the Mother of Parliaments. In fact, they'll even milk it to the last to show how determined they were to reach a mutually beneficial arrangement with an intransigent EU. But they won't budge an inch on what the Great Repeal Bill is really about, the hell-bent obsession with removing all engagement with EU authority regardless of the cost.

    And if today's opening jousts on the Bill's Second Reading are anything to go by, they'll get away with it. Labour will claim victory on parliamentary oversight, some loudmouths on the Tory right will brag about how they preserved the purity of Brexit, some Remainers will find solace in winning some insignificant amendments, a few committed Tory Remainers will sacrifice their careers by rebelling but they'll be cancelled out by dogmatic Labour Brexiteers and the odd MP panicking over reaction in their overwhelmingly pro-Brexit constituency. But the meat of the Great Repeal Bill will survive.
    As a fervent Remainer, I hope it doesn't.

    Your post is a good read though - as usual.
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  9. #5009
    Tribal Tribal is online now

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    I can't pretend to understand its significance in detail so I'll proffer only a superficial swipe.

    My initial impression upon when it was first posited last year was it allowed the UK to carry over EU laws after March 2019. The assumption then was that this would allow the UK to leisurely unpick the EU laws it didn't like as if they were suggestions for a theme for the annual hunt ball.

    This is quiet literally the recipe for having cake and eating it too, as it requires the counter party, the EU to be at the ball.

    We've gone past incredulous and are now wading neck deep into farce as only in the UKs delusions will this repeal act have any actual tangible purpose whilst the real urgent matters of concluding an EU settlement deal and starting future trade talks are been shunted off into the future like some trifling inconvenient audience with some insignificant natives with an piffling rights complaint in some far flung corner of the Empire which is of no consequence to the seating arrangement at this years law society banquet.

    To me the only thing Great about this act is the labyrinthine obscurities by which the government gains latitude to legally evade reality.
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  10. #5010
    gracethepirate gracethepirate is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tribal View Post
    I can't pretend to understand its significance in detail so I'll proffer only a superficial swipe.

    My initial impression upon when it was first posited last year was it allowed the UK to carry over EU laws after March 2019. The assumption then was that this would allow the UK to leisurely unpick the EU laws it didn't like as if they were suggestions for a theme for the annual hunt ball.

    This is quiet literally the recipe for having cake and eating it too, as it requires the counter party, the EU to be at the ball.

    We've gone past incredulous and are now wading neck deep into farce as only in the UKs delusions will this repeal act have any actual tangible purpose whilst the real urgent matters of concluding an EU settlement deal and starting future trade talks are been shunted off into the future like some trifling inconvenient audience with some insignificant natives with an piffling rights complaint in some far flung corner of the Empire which is of no consequence to the seating arrangement at this years law society banquet.

    To me the only thing Great about this act is the labyrinthine obscurities by which the government gains latitude to legally evade reality.
    The Independent agrees with you in this editorial published on 6 September:

    The 'Great' Repeal Bill deserves to fail

    As is becoming increasingly clear, the real consequences of leaving the EU are turning out to be radically different to those vaguely supposed during the referendum campaign
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