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  1. #21
    Catalpast Catalpast is offline
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    John Hu?

    Vastly overrated IMO


    - but the irony is SF are now more SDLP


    - than the SDLP!
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  2. #22
    The Eagle of the Ninth The Eagle of the Ninth is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by gatsbygirl20 View Post
    Yeah, Neeson has that low, bardic Celtic thing going on, a voice more suited to the delivery of poetry.. .(*Lightbulb*.. Could Neeson be persuaded to run for the Presidency? )

    But yes, there were a lot of self-satisfied talking heads bent on carving out their place in history as the architects of the peace

    But it occurred to me as I was watching it and feeling a tad irritated for the reasons you mention, that there might be young folk who do not know the details of what my generation regard as recent events---and that the revisiting of these events, even in a broadbrush fashion, is worthwhile

    It is no harm for the next generation to see the complex painstaking, slow work by many gifted men and women which went into forging some kind of peaceful accommodation

    How fragile that is. How hard to create. How easily shattered
    The lives of many - maybe my own - are owed to John Hume.

    There are children who will be born in generations to come because of him.

    Thats the long view. Thats what he did. Few will realise that.
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  3. #23
    Civic_critic2 Civic_critic2 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Windowshopper View Post
    Funnily enough one of my reservations about the doc wasn't its facts which are largely correct but the thought of ' do Americans really need a documentary about how American foreign policy is a force for good in the world?' It was in Northern Ireland and a lot of places but I think Americans instinctively see themselves as the 'good guys' (indeed one of the talking heads said that the American view of foreign policy as good v bad guys was part of the problem of Irish American interaction with the issue of NI up until Hume's missions to America), which can lead to an uncritical support of American adventurism among the American public. They really don't need that reinforced, the opposite in fact.
    American foreign policy was central to Whitaker's abandonment of the build-up of indigenous industry, replaced by FDI which was lauded as progressive but was a reiteration of an old policy, dependence. It has eventually bought out our foreign and even domestic policy and laid the groundwork for the kind of half-baked country driven by a management class that we have been delivered into today. It is only those who do not understand what could and should have been with our demographic and materal resources that praise this policy. It is only reactionaries benefitting from the status quo, or fooled by them, who see this as progressive.

    Today they are turning to Europe, with ferries by god that should have been plying the seas 70 years ago but which are being introduced by this backward management class with much fanfare and self-congratulation. A new reiteration, a new false turn.
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  4. #24
    Catalpast Catalpast is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Eagle of the Ninth View Post
    The lives of many - maybe my own - are owed to John Hume.

    There are children who will be born in generations to come because of him.

    Thats the long view. Thats what he did. Few will realise that.
    Jeepers - your on the Gin early tonight Eagles!
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  5. #25
    Ratio Et Fides Ratio Et Fides is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalpast View Post
    Jeepers - your on the Gin early tonight Eagles!
    Far be it from me to defend someone who sadistically stalked me on here for a very long time however in the post you quoted by her there she is completely right. A lot of Ulster folk on both sides of the Peace Wall feel an immense debt of gratitude to the man.
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  6. #26
    The Eagle of the Ninth The Eagle of the Ninth is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalpast View Post
    Jeepers - your on the Gin early tonight Eagles!
    Im talking to someone who counts brown faces in Blanchardstown Shopping Centre and thinks he has psychic powers enabling him to tell what other posters have consumed in the course of the day.

    You shouldnt even be on a thread about John Hume.
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  7. #27
    TheField TheField is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by razorblade View Post
    John Hume one of the greatest men in Irish history who played a major role in bringing peace to NI and ending the troubles sadly he now suffers from dementia but his role in Irish politics will never be forgotten.
    John Hume & John Redmond - great Irishmen of different eras who sought the path of peaceful reconciliation, both sadly eclipsed by violent Nationalism.
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  8. #28
    wombat wombat is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheField View Post
    John Hume & John Redmond - great Irishmen of different eras who sought the path of peaceful reconciliation, both sadly eclipsed by violent Nationalism.
    Not comparable, Hume was dedicated to non violence, he refused the offer of a gun for self protection, Redmond supported the war effort in WWI
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  9. #29
    cricket cricket is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Civic_critic2 View Post
    American foreign policy was central to Whitaker's abandonment of the build-up of indigenous industry, replaced by FDI which was lauded as progressive but was a reiteration of an old policy, dependence. It has eventually bought out our foreign and even domestic policy and laid the groundwork for the kind of half-baked country driven by a management class that we have been delivered into today. It is only those who do not understand what could and should have been with our demographic and materal resources that praise this policy. It is only reactionaries benefitting from the status quo, or fooled by them, who see this as progressive.

    Today they are turning to Europe, with ferries by god that should have been plying the seas 70 years ago but which are being introduced by this backward management class with much fanfare and self-congratulation. A new reiteration, a new false turn.
    "build up of indigenous industry", for the most part, apart from agriculture, it owed more to protectionism than anything else. Fact is agriculture was never going to provide the level of employment necessary, even if meat processing, etc. was done here rather than exporting the cattle and pigs, etc.
    The likes of Fords and Dunlops in Cork, big employers, were hugely dependent on protectionism which was never going to last as we sought FDI to make up the numbers and provide the income so badly needed.
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  10. #30
    michael-mcivor michael-mcivor is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by PAGE61 View Post
    After watching the Documentary John Hume in America which was basically John Hume's life in politics I was surprised by a few insights.

    Hume was indeed a fiery and actionable politician in the early days of his career in Derry , His pacifist stance including his now famous walk on the beach had echo's of Gandhi.

    He was praised by Carter/Clinton/Mitchell but not by Seamus Mallin and there was no inclusion of Sinn Fein in the doc.

    Though he loomed large in the visual images of the peace process he came across as an isolated figure and if you read between the lines , one who's ideals could be commended but were not ground-breaking.

    Of course the documentary stated as fact that he alone had singlehandedly brought peace to the island we live on.

    anybody see it?
    John Hume swore allegiance to the anti-Catholic brit Crown at Westminster to become its subject- he was no pacifist-
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